AEC Interesni Kazki at Mirus Gallery




"The Earth is Flat." The stars are holes in the veil of night. The crocodile is the keeper of the underworld. The north pole is a pyramid shaped mountain from which the oceans of the world pour out. These archaic concepts that were once collective truths have been replaced. Today we look at the scientific and religious dogma of the past with the same amusement that our descendants will one day look at us. Theories are reality until proven otherwise. Earthly existence is awash with depth and mystery, but it’s hard for us humans to live in the dark unknowing. We seek answers, and if no evidence, we speculate. Beliefs are fickle, ideas are fluid and now the technological bandwagon is careening ahead so quickly most can’t keep up with its developments.

We are living in the information age and a time of great technological inequality. The economic and

educational benefits of our inventions only reach those who can afford them. The divide is problematic but on the bright side allows other worlds to exist within this one. There is diversity of thought in disparity and old ideas persevere. Through exploring the planet one can see that the past, present and future coexist. The earth is now in fact a sphere and the stars are luminous balls of plasma. Still science and technology is not everyone’s god just yet; Blue skinned deities control the fate of millions, the dead dwell with the living, and magic spells cure the sick. While we rely on our smart phones to predict the weather, some can still just observe the day and know what is to come, as our ancestors did. Knowledge comes but it also gets lost. Within the thousands of years of interpretation, what connects us all and what have we forgotten? What can we agree on and what can we accept as unfathomable? Despite our different methods we can almost all agree that earth is in trouble. Though the saviour is ambiguous. A technological angel, a celestial king in white robes, or simply applying ancient knowledge today. Is our technology clouding our intuitive understanding of this world and our place in it? What applies to us all?

Looking into AEC’s work we see these questions. Just like life here on earth, the answers are entangled with duality and complexity. Struck with the same existential inquiries that have plagued the human imagination for centuries, we wonder in awe. We know there is meaning in everything, but we don’t know what it all means. The questions are important, and though we feel at the brink of understanding, solid answers are elusive to an open mind. We are invited into vast landscapes and narratives that replace the literal with metaphor. Time is void. Our planet is depicted not as a sphere, but a cube set ablaze. Gazing into a mirror a man sees the strong arm of the universe in his own reflection. In another painting a small bird removes an eye mask, enabling a blind man to see. A feminine force presents a flower in bloom while standing proudly on the head of an android. There is sublimity in these images. Alchemical transmutation of paint and ink into universal truths. The natural, supernatural, the divine, rock, mineral, plant and animal together speaking the language of paradise.

These images come at a time when artificial intelligence threatens to overthrow Gaian intelligence. When we yearn to understand distant planets like Mars while still so few understand the planet they call home. AEC peels back the curtains of dogma and cultural parameters allowing us to see glimpses of our own connectivity. Within the millions of stories, theories, and digital databases here are commonalities. The illusion that we are all separate dissolves. He reminds us to peer into the metaphysical background, not dwell in the spiritual vacuum of more technology.


What is god? Is there an afterlife? What is the soul? How does humankind live sustainably on this earth? They are the same questions we have asked since the beginning. AEC suggests that perhaps the answers that we yearn for have been all around us since the time the earth was flat. They were pointed to in the fundamental roots of religions before egos corrupted them. The mystics, poets, and artists knew. As did indigenous peoples living in harmony within all creation. Like these paintings existence here on earth is full of riddles but clues are in every seed, in every cell, in natural phenomena, in presence. Within the elaborations of science, religion, mythology, cosmology, myths and fairytales are universal truths. We see this kinship in AEC’s images and paradoxically the acceptance that there will always be more to this world than what we humans can perceive. Reviving our humanity adrift a chaotic system of symbols and explanations, we are humbled.   


-Aaron Glasson

"The Earth is Flat" by AEC Interesni Kazki at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco



Photo by Katie Pilgrim


Photo by Katie Pilgrim


Photo by Katie Pilgrim








Amara Por Dios Murals in San Francisco

We recently had Amara Por Dios and her partner out to San Francisco to paint a few murals. The two paint together under the moniker "God's Flesh." Find these murals in the Mission, Dogpatch, Bayview, and Tenderloin neighborhoods of San Francisco. 

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim



Zio Zeigler "Bernard Gwilliam & the Quantum Modernism"

Bernard Gwilliam and the Quantum Modernism marks a shift in Ziegler’s work. Known to be prolific in both his gallery exhibitions and murals worldwide, this exhibition presents a cohesive group of paintings and sculptures dedicated to a yearlong investigation, into both formal properties and his own identity. While the work is distinctly recognizable, there is a clear formal evolution, marked by the tight color palette and often highly detailed and refined brushstrokes. Ziegler’s newest canvases, which he considers open source allegories, are a form of modern history painting. Laden with symbols, cultural and historic references, citations to literary and art history these rich and textured paintings, draw from philosophy, mathematics and mythology.
Ziegler’s theory of Quantum Modernism builds on the philosophy of French structuralist Roland Barthes who understood the text or artwork as limited by focusing on the creator’s influence. Quantum Modernism accepts that any given audience has a near in nite amount of information that is rapidly accessible, thus the context behind a given artwork is provided by the audience themselves, rather than the artist. As Barthes notes in the essay The Death of the Author, “the unity in a text lies not in its origins, but in its destination.” Ziegler’s works are so layered, that a single viewer can understand a single artwork in multiple ways from different perspectives simultaneously. Concurrently, the pseudonym Bernard Gwilliam, which fuses the name of Ziegler’s grandfather with his mother’s maiden name, further indicates the artist’s attempt to remove his own name and influence from the search for meaning. 
- Jules Maeght Gallery 

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim



Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Photo by Katie Pilgrim


Photo by Katie Pilgrim

Interview: Infamous JeanClaude "Trinity of Oneness"

Infamous JeanClaude, "Frequencies in Fractions," digital collage



We are excited to see Infamous JeanClaude grinding on a new body of work for his upcoming collaborative show, "Trinity of Oneness," in Charlotte, NC with Cedric Umoja and Dogon Krigga. Thanks to the artist for spending time catching up with us. 


You've been on a hiatus from making work. How has your style or practice evolved since your last show?

Yeah. I was creating sporadically throughout last year, but this was the first year in a very long time that I didn't have a consistent flow with my art. I was dealing with some depression and was uninspired. These two issues had me in a choke hold for over a year. It felt so weird because I have thousands of ideas in my head but I was super unmotivated. It was a very awkward and tough period.

Once I climbed out of my depression and got my health issues under control it was like a windshield wiper cleared my brain and I was about to create more freely. My style has become a lot more loose, especially my graphic work, but I still have my elements of abstraction and clean lines in my pieces. I'm pretty excited to see how my style has unfolded/will unfold since last year.

I also haven't done a group or solo show in about two or three years because I have been doing more commissions for musicians and clothing lines.


How does your studio practice vary when you're painting versus when you are making digital work?
 

When I'm painting, it's usually just me with the canvas, paints and music blasting in my headphones. I probably got some incense going and my snacks near. I'm not really on my phone or anything when I'm working on paintings. I usually like to zone out and really take in the pieces that I'm working on. If you've ever seen that scene in the movie Basquiat where he plays the same song over and over but is working on like seven big pieces at once, the feeling is like that but a lot of smaller pieces and a smaller studio space.

Working digitally is similar but a little more free. I can be mobile with my work so I can work in a library or a coffee shop. When I need breaks I might surf the internet or check up on social media here and there. It's a little more sporadic but I have moments just like painting when I'll stare at the composition for a long time or maneuvering one piece 50 times until I find the right space for it to fit the composition. 


Infamous JeanClaude, "Float Like/Strong Like (Me, Myself and I)," digital collage


What is your connection to the other artists in Trinity of Oneness? 



Cedric Umoja is like a spiritual advisor and mentor to me. We're always diving deep in conversation on how to expand our craft and become better alchemists to speak to the masses. We've always talked about collabing over the years but we both have been busy, so this was perfect timing for both of us. I haven't formally met Dogon Krigga yet but I have been following his work for a few years now. It's interesting between us because we seem to fall in the same frequency a lot of times with our work, which is dope. That's why we all came together for this show. We all have similar themes and ideals but we show them in different ways. It was only right that we came together for a group show to get that good energy and vibes triple the source to the people.



Your work tends to be a narrative for your personal philosophy and spiritual experiences. Are there any specific themes present in this new body of work?

This new body of work is based around past life regressions, my ancestors, my heritage, life/death and the future. There's been a lot of important people passing in 2016 and I believe that is telling us there's going to be a big shift. I believe artists and musicians are going to be a part of the big shift of consciousness and I'm just trying to get people thinking like the artists that are in this show. This show is called "Trinity of Oneness." This is saying that we are all connected in some form and we are drawn to those who understand this idea. 

It is also balance: me, myself and I / Ego, Self, Understanding : Trinity


Infamous JeanClaude, "Golden Aura Angel," digital collage


What's your view on collective consciousness?

I believe are all connected. We just have to take ourselves outside of religion, tradition, school conditioning, loyalty ( by fear), etc. in order find our purpose, which will link you with like minds. It becomes a continuous cycle until it spreads into universal love. You just have to think, "What is my purpose? What is my gift?" and use that gift to help others unlock and understand their gifts.

We are also entering into a thought realm of manifesting and creating.  Feminine energy, I believe, will become prominent and will start balancing out the masculine energy that has been dominating our society for a long time. This is where the creatives will step in, bringing the half into a whole, helping push unity/oneness.


Favorite studio snack?

My go-to is anything gummy. Gummy, bears, gummy worms, etc. (Even though my brother showed me a video on how they are made and I probably should stop eating them.... but Ive been addicted since birth haha).My secondary choices that usually end up going with the gummy snacks are plain Lays, pretzels, water, and apple juice.




Collage by Dogon Krigga
Illustration by Cedric Umoja

Rich Fonseca "Ah Om" at Luna Rienne Gallery

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.



"Ah Um, the title of a Charles Mingus album, is the sound one makes before introducing themselves to a large audience. With this, his second solo show, Fonseca will present his developing series of single- and mutli-plane vortex paintings.


Rich Fonseca is a self-taught painter and illustrator who uses geometry and color to convey how memories change, distort, and fracture with the passage of time. The placement of color arranges pattern over rhythm, utilizing op-art techniques to convey different layers of perception and interpretation. He lives and works in San Francisco."     -Luna Rienne


"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

"Ah Um" by Rich Fonseca at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. Photo by Katie Pilgrim.

SF Skate Club Fundraiser This Sunday

Bigfoot was kind enough to donate a hand-painted skate deck to in support of SF Skate Club's upcoming Fundraiser. SFSC is a non-profit that is home for the Eduskate after school program, where middle school kids come after class to get mentoring, homework help, and skate time with a Pro, Shawn Connolley. This program is run by Shawn and his incredible wife, Thuy. It's a true pillar for San Francisco community and youth.

All proceeds for their fundraiser will directly benefit Eduskate.




Swoon and Monica Canilao "Witch-Wife"


   "Caledonia Curry — better known as Swoon — and Monica Canilao, the artists in the current show, call their joint project “Witch-Wife.” The phrase is an antiquated name for a witch. More provocatively, it is the title of a short poem, published in 1917, by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Written in the melancholy years just before American entry into World War I, the poem tells of a beautiful and beguiling, yet untamable and unattainable, woman. (Unattainable, at least, to men — the poem has been read as a lesbian anthem.)
   The exhibition touches on many other themes: motherhood, time, poverty, myth. Far from any linear narrative, however, it tumbles them together with the illogic of a dream. That’s not a bad thing: The best dreams are full of surprise twists and mysterious turns, which can be frightful, illuminating or amusing (often all of these). Half the gallery is a double-height space that Swoon and Canilao have packed with precariously towering sculptural works, stitched and tacked together from antique fabrics and remnant objects, building to immense forms that might be female giants in Victorian dress. This is where the exhibition really takes off, launching us into a dark landscape of free association and vaguely cinematic fantasy. 
  The challenge of authentically describing dreams or evincing the dream state has frustrated the most skillful of artists throughout history. Manifestations, perhaps, of the collective unconscious, dreams are, at the same time, unique to the dreamer. For several years Swoon has managed a project she calls “Dream Reliquary,” a website where hundreds of contributors have left descriptions of their dreams. By incorporating that bank of fantasy into an extraordinary environment of their own imagination, the artists have expanded their collaboration. The witch-wives need only us, the final element, to complete their spell."  
 - Charles Desmarais for SF Gate